Would US go to War with N. Korea to Stop Democracy in South Korea?
Thursday, 20 April 2017

In South Korea's upcoming Presidential election, the leading candidates are both to the left of the impeached leader they seek to replace.

With North Korea and the United States trading rhetorical jabs like geo-political boxers, few people have considered how recent events in South Korea may have effected the American decision to intensify the situation in North Korea.

This year, on the 10th of March, South Korean President Park Geun-hye was removed from office. She was later arrested and is currently still behind bars.

President Park was deeply pro-American and considered to be on the militant end of the spectrum of South Korean politics.

Although Park’s removal from office stemmed from wide ranging allegations of corruption, many South Koreans who favour a political and demilitarised approach to solving the Korean peninsula’s protected problems, breathed a collective sigh of relief.

There is a clear relationship between American rhetoric and military manoeuvrings becoming intensified and Park being removed from office and put under arrest.  Whether this relationship is causal or coincidental is best determined by analysing who might benefit from accelerating tensions on the Korean peninsula.

Acting President Hwang Kyo-ahn has ruled himself  out from running in the next Presidential election which will take place on the 9th of May.

Among the current contenders, recent opinion polls have shown that Moon Jae-in is leading the race.

Moon’s policies are generally to the left of former President Park and many have speculated that he could seriously challenge American military dominance of South Korean foreign policy.

Ahn Cheol-soo who is second to Moon in opinion polls is even more to left, having opposed the delivery of American THAAD Missiles to South Korea and has even called himself the Bernie Sanders of South Korea.

If a large war broke out in the Korean peninsula prior to the 9th of May, it would likely result in the postponing of the election, an election where two candidates whose foreign policy stance is far to the left of the outgoing administration, will likely finish on top.

It is no secret that many members of the US intelligence community and military community would prefer a more right-wing, military orientated leader in Seoul.

Could it therefore be that the US deep state has decided that in persuading Trump to get more bellicose about North Korea, that Trump could see his approval ratings go up and that simultaneously the US could retard South Korea’s political march to the more peace orientated left?

Stranger things and indeed more wicked things have happened. This is certainly a possibility. //Adam Garrie

 

 



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